The Chemically Controlled Cosmos

556,37 

The Chemically Controlled Cosmos Astronomical Molecules from the Big Bang to Exploding Stars Autor: T. W. Hartquist, D. A. Williams


Molecules in the early Universe acted as natural temperature regulators, keeping the primordial gas cool and, in turn, allowing galaxies and stars to be born. Even now, such similarly simple chemistry continues to control a wide variety of the exotic objects that populate our cosmos. What are the tools of the trade for the cosmic chemist? What can they teach us about the Universe we live in? These are the questions answered in this engaging and informative guide, The Chemically Controlled Cosmos. In clear, non-technical terms, and without formal mathematics, we learn how to study and understand the behaviour of molecules in a host of astronomical situations. We study the secretive formation of stars deep within interstellar clouds, the origin of our own Solar System, the cataclysmic deaths of many massive stars that explode as supernovae, and the hearts of active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the Universe

Na stanie (może być zamówiony)

SKU: 9780521419833 Kategoria:

The Chemically Controlled Cosmos Astronomical Molecules from the Big Bang to Exploding Stars Autor: T. W. Hartquist, D. A. Williams


Molecules in the early Universe acted as natural temperature regulators, keeping the primordial gas cool and, in turn, allowing galaxies and stars to be born. Even now, such similarly simple chemistry continues to control a wide variety of the exotic objects that populate our cosmos. What are the tools of the trade for the cosmic chemist? What can they teach us about the Universe we live in? These are the questions answered in this engaging and informative guide, The Chemically Controlled Cosmos. In clear, non-technical terms, and without formal mathematics, we learn how to study and understand the behaviour of molecules in a host of astronomical situations. We study the secretive formation of stars deep within interstellar clouds, the origin of our own Solar System, the cataclysmic deaths of many massive stars that explode as supernovae, and the hearts of active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the Universe. We are given an accessible introduction to a wealth of astrophysics, and an understanding of how cosmic chemistry facilitates the investigation of many of the most exciting questions concerning astronomy today.


Spis treści: Preface 1. A brief history 2. Setting the astronomical scene 3. The tools of the trade 4. Chemistry after the Big Bang 5. Interstellar clouds – the birth places of stars 6. Star formation 7. The solar system at birth 8. Stellar winds and outflows 9. Astronomical masers near bright stars 10. Supernovae: fairly big bang 11. Active galaxies 12. Epilogue Index.


dla: general readers

isbn 9780521419833
stron 185
Data publikacji 07/12/1995
64 b/w illus. 5 tables
Hardback 247 x 174 mm

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234,23 

The Chemically Controlled Cosmos Astronomical Molecules from the Big Bang to Exploding Stars Autor: T. W. Hartquist, D. A. Williams


Molecules in the early Universe acted as natural temperature regulators, keeping the primordial gas cool and, in turn, allowing galaxies and stars to be born. Even now, such similarly simple chemistry continues to control a wide variety of the exotic objects that populate our cosmos. What are the tools of the trade for the cosmic chemist? What can they teach us about the Universe we live in? These are the questions answered in this engaging and informative guide, The Chemically Controlled Cosmos. In clear, non-technical terms, and without formal mathematics, we learn how to study and understand the behaviour of molecules in a host of astronomical situations. We study the secretive formation of stars deep within interstellar clouds, the origin of our own Solar System, the cataclysmic deaths of many massive stars that explode as supernovae, and the hearts of active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the Universe

Na stanie (może być zamówiony)

SKU: 9780521056373 Kategoria:

The Chemically Controlled Cosmos Astronomical Molecules from the Big Bang to Exploding Stars Autor: T. W. Hartquist, D. A. Williams


Molecules in the early Universe acted as natural temperature regulators, keeping the primordial gas cool and, in turn, allowing galaxies and stars to be born. Even now, such similarly simple chemistry continues to control a wide variety of the exotic objects that populate our cosmos. What are the tools of the trade for the cosmic chemist? What can they teach us about the Universe we live in? These are the questions answered in this engaging and informative guide, The Chemically Controlled Cosmos. In clear, non-technical terms, and without formal mathematics, we learn how to study and understand the behaviour of molecules in a host of astronomical situations. We study the secretive formation of stars deep within interstellar clouds, the origin of our own Solar System, the cataclysmic deaths of many massive stars that explode as supernovae, and the hearts of active galactic nuclei, the most powerful objects in the Universe. We are given an accessible introduction to a wealth of astrophysics, and an understanding of how cosmic chemistry facilitates the investigation of many of the most exciting questions concerning astronomy today.


Spis treści: Preface 1. A brief history 2. Setting the astronomical scene 3. The tools of the trade 4. Chemistry after the Big Bang 5. Interstellar clouds – the birth places of stars 6. Star formation 7. The solar system at birth 8. Stellar winds and outflows 9. Astronomical masers near bright stars 10. Supernovae: fairly big bang 11. Active galaxies 12. Epilogue Index.


dla: general readers

isbn 9780521056373
stron 188
Data publikacji 27/03/2008
64 b/w illus. 5 tables
Paperback 244 x 170 mm

Written by admin

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Twój adres email nie zostanie opublikowany. Pola, których wypełnienie jest wymagane, są oznaczone symbolem *